Ground rules set for Brexit culture deal

Ground rules set for Brexit culture deal

The government’s Brexit white paper has set out a basis to ensure artists’ mobility between the UK and Europe after Brexit.

Battersea Arts Centre heralds reopening with Trump protest

Battersea Arts Centre heralds reopening with Trump protest

Three years since Battersea Arts Centre’s great hall burnt down, it is pre-empting it autumn opening today with a defiant message for Donald Trump https://www.bac.org.uk.

TAITMAIL   What, me worry, when Mr Wright has come along?

TAITMAIL What, me worry, when Mr Wright has come along?

Who is Jeremy Wright, the headlines on Tuesday were asking.  For me, he bears an unnerving likeness to Mad Magazine’sAlfred E Neuman (a kind of 1960s Forrest Gump who only ever said “What, me worry?”), but he was the Attorney General and is now the seventh Secretary State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport since 2010.

Dulwich to get a Colour Palace

Dulwich to get a Colour Palace

Dulwich Picture Gallery in South London is to get a “Colour Palace” for its gardens next summer.

Shakespeare Schools wins Japanese arts prize

Shakespeare Schools wins Japanese arts prize

The Shakespeare Schools Foundation has won £33,000 in the Japan Art Association’s Praemium Imperiale 2018 awards.

Matthew Bourne’s tours to go green

Matthew Bourne’s tours to go green

Matthew Bourne’s New Adventures dance company is to collaborate with environmental sustainability agency Julie’s Bicycle to creative a creative green certificate for touring.

Arts centre plan for Reading Gaol

Arts centre plan for Reading Gaol

Councillors in Reading are backing a plan to turn the town’s famous jail into an arts centre.

New culture secretary appointed

New culture secretary appointed

Kenilworth MP and former Attorney General Jeremy Wright MP is the latest Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport .

New 'Netflix for the arts' to launch

A company has announced plans to to set up a vesrion of Netflix for the arts.

Creative Europe impact on UK bigger than €74m spend

Creative Europe impact on UK bigger than €74m spend

Two reports out today show that since 2014 the European art development fund, Creative Europe, has spent €74m on 334 UK-based organisations and companies and helped distribute 145 British films in other European countries, but the impact has been worth far more.

Historic London swings

Historic London swings

London’s landmarks have been put to music in the latest phase of the Musicity project, devised to bring a new dimension to familiar architecture.

Boom in book adaptation earnings

Boom in book adaptation earnings

The value to the economy of film, television and theatre adaptations of books is soaring, according to a new report from the Publishers Association – thanks to our copyright laws.

National gets rare Gentileschi self-portrait

National gets rare Gentileschi self-portrait

A self-portrait by Artemisia Gentileschi, who broke the glass ceiling for female artists in 17thcentury Florence, has been acquired by the National Gallery for £3.6m.

Horniman Museum goes greener

Horniman Museum goes greener

The Horniman Museum in South London has ditched its café’s plastic utensils for plant-based coffee cups to sandwich wrappers in an effort to go greener https://www.horniman.ac.uk.

Gainsborough’s home to be national centre

Gainsborough’s home to be national centre

Thomas Gainsborough’s childhood home in Sudbury, Suffolk, is to become a national centre for celebrating the 18thcentury painter’s work, with the Heritage Lottery Fund awarding the scheme £4.5m.

Tate St Ives ‘carved out of rock’ is Museum of the Year

Tate St Ives ‘carved out of rock’ is Museum of the Year

Tate St Ives is the 2018 Art Fund Museum of the Year, winning the £100,000 prize, the richest in the world.

Opera Rara goes global with Warner

Opera Rara goes global with Warner

Opera Rara, the company that finds, restores, presents and records lost operatic masterpieces, has today announced a deal with Warner Classics that will give its recordings worldwide distribution.

MU to probe music education

MU to probe music education

The Musicians’ Union has commissioned new research into music education in the UK.

FESTIVALS King of the Tyne

A unique festival connects the River Tyne to the legacy of civil rights activist Dr Martin Luther King. Patrick Kelly reports

The Tyne Bridge will stand in for another iconic bridge as part of a spectacular perfomance celebrating the courage and sacrifice of civil rights campaigner Dr Martin Luther King.

On Sunday October 29, the bridge will become the Edmund Pettus bridge in Selma, Alabama, scene of one of the most famous moments in the civil rights movement as King and his sup- porters were attacked by police while peacefully marching across.

Freedom on the Tyne will bring together international artists, performers and community groups from across NewcastleGateshead in a unique afternoon of theatre, music, dance and art. Starting from various locations across the city, four stories of the global struggle for civil rights will be told in a unique performance, building through- out the day before coming to a climax on the Tyne Bridge. Hundreds of local actors, dancers, singers, musicians and performers will be recruited from communities from across Newcastle and Gateshead to work alongside professional artists to bring Freedom on the Tyne to life.

Behind this extraordinary event is the little-known fact that Martin Luther King visited the city to accept an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle, the only such honour accorded him by a UK institution in his lifetime. The university has been celebrating this event in a quiet way for many years, but on the 50th anniversary, it was keen to make a bigger splash. It got together with production company Northern Roots and the Newcastle Gateshead Initiative, and made a bid for support from ACE’s Ambition for Excellence funding strand. ACE bosses believe that a major event like this is a way of using art to create a step change in diversity within Newcastle’s cultural offer.

The performance is part of Freedom City, a year-long, city-wide programme looking at the three themes - war, poverty and racism - of King’s acceptance speech back in 1967. For example, Newcastle’s regular Juice Music festival is taking over the Hancock museum with a celebration of the positive social changes which have taken place over the last 50 years. The Hancock is also devoting an exhibition to the story of Dr King’s visit. Other events include exhibitions at the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, a painting by artist Frank Briffa at Gosforth Civic Theatre and a new installation created by a team of young writers from Seven Stories, the National Centre for Children’s Books.

“The people of NewcastleGateshead will be the stars of the performance,” says Tim Supple, who will direct from a script by BAFTA-award winning playwright Roy Williams. “But even people coming to watch will be involved in a moving, inspiring and memorable afternoon. Standing together on the Tyne Bridge in a moment of reflection and solidarity for civil rights will be a powerful and striking image to send the world.”

Supple, a former artistic director of the Young Vic Theatre, has several large scale international productions on his CV, including an Indian version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream for Dash Arts and the epic Arabic story, One Thousand and One Nights, at Edinburgh International Festival, but he has been struck by the extraordinary level of co-operation in the city, from the local councils to local community organisations and commercial businesses.

“There’s no perfect rulebook for organising this sort of event, but there are two really important factors – the way that the creation of something pulls people together and the legacy created in getting the involvement of people not usually engaged in the arts,” he says. “It’s best to describe it as a people’s passion play. It’s not a spectacle, it’s an unforgettable experience, not just for those who take part but for everyone who sees it.”

The arena for the event is not just the bridge, “one of the best performance venues I have ever seen” says Supple, it is the city itself. Four events at four locations will look at the massacres in Amritsar, Sharpeville, Peterloo and of course, the incident at Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge. From there, four processions, plus a group commemorating the Jarrow march, will converge on the bridge, which bears a striking resemblance to its counterpart in Alabama.

“Despite all those tragedies,” points out Supple, “this is a story of triumph as the spirit behind these protests finally won through in terms of the rights and freedoms we enjoy today.”

Vikki Leaney, senior festival and events manager at NewcastleGates- head Initiative, said organising the event on October 29 will be a major operation, even for a city well used to holding major events. “In some ways it will also be a step change for Newcastle and Gateshead too. We are used to getting organisations to co-operate here but this is like holding the Great North Run, New Year’s Eve parade and a host of political demos all at once.”

The NGI is also pleased that although the programme was kick-started by that Arts Council grant of £595,000, they estimate that they have garnered more than £1m in match funding from a variety of sources in the cities of Newcastle and Gateshead. In some ways, the event can almost be seen as a trial run for the Great Exhibition of the North, the George Osborne-inspired event designed to provide a cultural impetus to the Northern Powerhouse.

Print Email

AINews