Thanet council plans museum handover

Thanet council plans museum handover

Campaigners are calling on Thanet District Council to halt its plans to sell Margate Museum, with more than 100 people have signed a petition to keep the heritage building, once a police station, in public hands.

DEA BIRKETT   Paris – where the show never closed

DEA BIRKETT Paris – where the show never closed

In the first of a series marking the 250th anniversary of the circus, Dea Birkett– the official Ringmaster of Circus250 – goes to Paris where circus is defying the gilets jaunes

Outdated systems blocking creativity growth - CIF

Outdated systems blocking creativity growth - CIF

Growth in the creative industries is being stymied by government and policy bodies working by out-dated definitions, according to a report published today by the Cultural Industries Federation (CIF).

Pitzhanger to re-open after £12m restoration

Pitzhanger to re-open after £12m restoration

Pitzhanger Manor, the dream country home created for himself and his family by Sir John Soane, in his time England’s most celebrated architect, is to reopen in March after major restoration.  

TAITMAIL    Art, Larry, and how another Christmas saved the world

TAITMAIL Art, Larry, and how another Christmas saved the world

By Simon Tait

I’ll spare you another Brexit sermon, that can wait at least a week. Instead I can take advantage of the fact that today is December 7, the anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, and make a connection with the extraordinary polymath Larry Holofcener, who died last year aged 91, Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. 

‘Purity’ of boys’ voices – it’s Garrett v Bach Choir

‘Purity’ of boys’ voices – it’s Garrett v Bach Choir

Opera soprano Lesley Garrett’s call for an end to male-only choirs has been rebuffed by the head of one of the leading ensembles in the world, the Bach Choir.

New CEO for FACT

New CEO for FACT

FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) chooses Arts Catalyst's Nicola Triscott and new CEO

DEA BIRKETT Fifteen years ago, a museum visit changed my life

DEA BIRKETT Fifteen years ago, a museum visit changed my life

Last week we reported on the reopening of the V&A’s Cast Courts. Here, Dea Birkett recounts her own especial memory of them

Friends buy Burnley Empire for £1

Friends buy Burnley Empire for £1

The Victorian Burnley Empire has been saved by a friends group, days before it was due to go for auction.

Fitzwilliam’s gift of the Great Belzoni

Fitzwilliam’s gift of the Great Belzoni

The larger than life archaeologist, explorer and circus strong man known as the Great Belzoni is to adorn Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum.

The smartphone Turner Prize

The smartphone Turner Prize

Charlotte Prodger has won this year’s Turner Prize for visual art with a 32-minute film shot on her smartphone.

Rogers to leave Birmingham REP

Rogers to leave Birmingham REP

Executive director steps down after 17 years

To all Dome-loving humans…

To all Dome-loving humans…

David Shrigley has created this limited edition print with proceeds from sales going towards the Build Brighton Dome community appeal.

How WWI enriched contemporary art

How WWI enriched contemporary art

More than 35m people, half the population, have engaged with the 14-18 NOW commemorations of the First World War, which has now ended after five years.

Ally Pally theatre reopens after 80 years

Ally Pally theatre reopens after 80 years

Alexandra Palace’s theatre and East Court reopened at the weekend after a £27m, three-year restoration project.

What's up in… Bristol

What's up in… Bristol

AI looks at what's coming up around the country – this week, the arts in Bristol. 

Bid to save Turner’s Thames view

Bid to save Turner’s Thames view

The government has mounted a campaign to save J M W Turner’s painting Walton Bridgesfor the nation by placing an export stop on it.

Victorian art world – recast by the V&A

Victorian art world – recast by the V&A

The Cast Courts at the V&A, two of the museum’s original 1850s galleries, have reopened after a seven year programme, restored and refurbished as they were 160 years ago.

Brexit: May's deal and the arts

Brexit: May's deal and the arts

The Prime Minister’s withdrawal agreement still leaves the arts and cultural industries in doubt about the future.

Rhian Harris takes over in Lakes

Rhian Harris takes over in Lakes

Rhian Harris, director of the V&A Museum of Childhood since 2008, is to be the new chief executive of Lakeland Arts.

What's Up In... Manchester & Salford

What's Up In... Manchester & Salford

In a new weekly feature AI looks at what's coming up around the country - starting with what's up in the arts in Manchester and Salford. 

Arts centre opens in Edinburgh observatory

Arts centre opens in Edinburgh observatory

A new contemporary arts centre, Collective, opens tomorrow, November 24, in one of Edinburgh’s most recognisable historic buildings.

All change at top of Oily Cart

All change at top of Oily Cart

Iconic children's theatre company Oily Cart has appointed Ellie Griffiths (right) as its new artistic director and Zoe Lally as its first executive director.

 Fight against climate change helps arts prosper

Fight against climate change helps arts prosper

Arts organisations are leading the way in sustaining the environment, according to a new report or Arts Council England, and benefitting financially as a result.

Simon Tait's Diary

Luminous Lewes

One of the most delightful county towns in the country gets the light treatment this weekend, but a son et lumiere with a difference in that it traces the ancient town’s long history. Among other things it’s the place where Thomas Paine wrote his Rights of Man, but the light installations pick out the many other things Lewes hosted, elucidated by poetry, music and performance created by the acclaimed poet/writer, John Agard, and Ruth Kerr, soprano/composer, with her choir, The Paddock Singers. It’s called LewesLight and is completely a non-commercial operation, with the professionals involved giving their services free, and is devised to give work experience opportunities for young people, and be a showcase for the work of digital media design, photography and production arts students at Sussex Downs College, Lewes, who have created it with the help of undergraduates from University of Brighton and Northbrook College, Worthing.

 

Burrell reborn

That strange and invaluable collection in what looks like a giant summerhouse in Glasgow’s Pollok Park, the Burrell Collection, has got £15m from the Heritage Lottery Fund to do the place up. The full cost is expected to be £66 million with half of it coming from Glasgow City Council and 80% of the rest already raised. The collection of 9,000 objects of art and design was given to the city by the businessman Sir William Burrell who specified that it should be housed somewhere 16 miles from the city centre. But there wasn’t anywhere, and in the end the current building was erected in the park in 1983, now listed. Now it is badly in need of refurbishment, and a new look. Here’s how the front elevation will look when the place reopens in 2019.

Paradise referred to

Where do poets find their muses? Well, in the work of other poets quite often, and Keats’s House Museum in Hampstead has discovered that the author of Ode to a Nightingale among a sheaf of other much-quoted Romantic poems liked to turn to John Milton and his Paradise Lost. And not just turn to - on display is Keats’s own copy which is covered in his notes and remarks, probably while he was working on his own epic works such as Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion. “Milton in every instance pursues his imagination to the utmost...he sees Beauty on the wing, pounces upon it and gorges it to the producing his essential verse...” he has scribbled in a margin. ‘The light and shade – the sort of black brightness...the thousand melancholies and Magnificences of this Page – leaves no room for anything to be said theron, but: ‘so it is’-.” It opens on December 6.

 

 

Squaring up to dance

Billed as a cross between The Office and an Australian cage fight, DanceEast in Ipswich
is offering this challenge in dance by the Australian dance company The Farm. It mixes slapstick, physical theatre and dance to tell the story about an office rivalry between an older and a younger man. It’s called, not unreasonably, Cock Fight and it starts on October 27.

Out of the water closet

Fred Hohler won the first Critics’ Circle Unsung Hero award the other day, and he chose the moment to announce his next project. The first one was the Public Catalogue Foundation, the enterprise to find and catalogue 230,000 oil paintings in public ownership but, as it were, hidden from public gaze. The 85 volumes he produced is now online as Art Line, an invaluable resource. The new one involves pictures like this fabulous 18th century picture of the new Royal Docks in London – he is turning his attention to bringing three centuries of watercolours, of up to 1900, out of the cupboards they’ve been hiding in. He’s calling it The Watercolour World,
it will eventually be online too, there is already sponsorship from the Marandi Foundation, and the Prince of Wales has agreed to be its patron.

 

Pop goes an illusion

So where do you think Pop Art was born? New York? Andy Warhol’s home town of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania? The Royal College of Art. Nah, and the real birthplace has just reopened after a £3.8m lottery-funded refurbishment. It’s Newcastle University’s Hatton Gallery where the godfathers of Pop Art Richard Hamilton and Victor Pasmore used

the gallery as a showcase for what they and their students were developing. Here are Hamilton and Pasmore, left and right, mounting one of their early exhibitions there. So the reopening show, running until January 20, is Pioneers of Pop, which includes the first use of the expression in a letter by Hamilton to friends dated 16 January 1957: “Pop Art is: popular, transient, expendable, low-cost, mass-produced, young, witty, sexy, gimmicky, glamorous, and Big Business”.

 

 

 

Print Email

AINews