Abramovich and Chelsea to sponsor new Holocaust galleries

Abramovich and Chelsea to sponsor new Holocaust galleries

Roman Abramovich and Chelsea FC are to sponsor the Imperial War Museum’s new Holocaust galleries, opening in 2021.

Shell turns back on National Gallery

Shell turns back on National Gallery

Shell, the Anglo-Dutch oil company, has ceased its sponsorship of the National Gallery after  12 years.

A Wound in Time - Poet Laureate’s Armistice poem

A Wound in Time - Poet Laureate’s Armistice poem

Carol Ann Duffy, the Poet Laureate, has today released a sonnet commemorating the centenary of Armistice Day, 11thNovember 1918.

MY STORY:  Diplomacy, diversity, outreach – museums’ modern challenges

MY STORY: Diplomacy, diversity, outreach – museums’ modern challenges

Following a career in the United States as a corporate lawyer and a management consultant, Tonya Nelson has recently become director of museums and cultural programmes at University College London

FEEDBACK:  ‘Remarkable’ Derby is richer than you think

FEEDBACK: ‘Remarkable’ Derby is richer than you think

Reader Mike Wheeler responds to a recent TaitMail

Our schools’ missing component arts

Our schools’ missing component arts

The Time to Listen report on cultural provision in schools was launched at the House of Lords this week by the Royal Shakespeare Company and Tate, and it raises alarm bells on arts provision in schools. In a special feature, drama critic Michael Coveney sums up its message

TAITMAIL      Goodbye to all that

TAITMAIL Goodbye to all that

By Patrick Kelly

In recent years the European Capital of Culture award seems to have gone to cities that most Brits would find hard to place.  It’s as if the EU was playing a Continental version of the game where you have to name the more obscure London Underground stations.

Theatre’s local heroes

Theatre’s local heroes

The Theatres Trust annual conference this week heard that partnerships with local authorities are providing successful community theatre projects in the face of austerity. Simon Tait reports

Liverpool to invest in musical heritage

Liverpool to invest in musical heritage

Mayor backs improvements to city centre locations

A third of theatres may close without £1/2bn upgrades

A third of theatres may close without £1/2bn upgrades

More than £550m is needed in the next five years to upgrade our theatres, or a third may be forced to close, according to new Theatres Trust research.

Scotland fears European arts exodus

Scotland fears European arts exodus

Survey suggests EU nationals may leave after Brexit

Clare O'Brien to run Mall Galleries

Clare O'Brien to run Mall Galleries

Clare O’Brien, director of Chiswick House, is to be the Mall Galleries’ new chief executive.

Uphill road to broadening art audiences

Uphill road to broadening art audiences

Research for Art UK shows that bringing young and black and multi-ethnic (BAME) people to art is a daunting task, against competition from social media.

Jubb stands down at Battersea Arts Centre

Jubb stands down at Battersea Arts Centre

David Jubb is to leave Battersea Arts Centre after 14 years as artistic director and CEO.

 Rights of Man and the White Hart, Lewes…

Rights of Man and the White Hart, Lewes…

Thomas Paine and his seminal work The Rights of Man are in the spotlight at Lewes in Sussex this weekend, and particularly at the White Hart Hotel.

V&A focuses on photo history with new centre

V&A focuses on photo history with new centre

The history of photography with some of the most iconic images ever taken as well as the earliest equipment are at heart of the Victoria and Albert Museum’s new Photographic Centre.

Borland’s ghostly tribute to WWI

Borland’s ghostly tribute to WWI

A major, though-provoking sculpture by Turner nominee Christine Borland to mark the end of the First World War was unveiled at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow today.

Bradford museums success

Bradford museums success

Visitor numbers up but opening hours under threat

Drama at your fingertips

The media production company Digital Theatre was founded in 2009 by stage and TV director Robert Delamere, now its CEO, and Tom Shaw to produce theatrical performances in high definition via its website. As it launches a new subscription platform, Robert Delamere describes the enterprise’s development so far

When Digital Theatre was founded we started out with a very simply idea - we wanted to make the performing arts accessible to all. 

Image: Leanne Rowe in the Frantic Assembly production of Abi Morgan’s Lovesong for the Lyric, Hammersmith

We sensed that the power of digital could be harnessed to great artistic, cultural and ultimately social effect. We looked at how theatre and the performing arts where served by the internet and how, at the time, digital technology and distribution hadn’t yet really impacted the wider arts industry. 

It’s been an incredible journey since the launch of the consumer service www.digitaltheatre.com and our sister education service www.digitaltheatreplus.com. Since then we’ve worked with some of the world’s great artists, writers, composers and directors and seen our audience grow and expand across more than 65 countries around the world.  

At Digital Theatre we believe that experiencing and having access to the arts is a vital part of what it means to be human. We also knew that we wanted that access to be available irrespective of social, economic or geographic circumstances. That was the simple inspiration behind the launch of the world’s first, online, performing arts platform. 

Digital Theatre now regularly collaborates with world-class producing houses include the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal Court and the Almeida, to capture their shows and stream them to the consumer in broadcast quality - up close and personal, for a best-seat-in-the-house viewing experience. By doing so we’re broadening access to these phenomenal productions, and preserving their impact for years to come. 

Most importantly we work as curators, working alongside the artists, actors, directors and writers involved. This collaboration ensures that the live capture of each performance follows the same values and intentions that were behind the original production, so that the live creation and the filmed digital capture work in harmony with each other. 

This month, Digital Theatre announced the launch of an online subscription platform that brings the best of live theatre, ballet, opera and classical concerts, to your own screen. Each performances can be streamed anytime, anywhere, to any device. For £9.99 per month, subscribers get unlimited access to all Digital Theatre’s current and future productions. For non-subscribers, each production is available to rent online for 48 hours, at a price of £7.99.

Subscribers will have access to over 65 productions, the majority of which are exclusive to DT, including: Simon Russell Beale in The Tempest, Paapa Essiedu in Hamlet and Antony Sher in King Lear, all from the Royal Shakespeare Company; Zoë Wanamaker and David Suchet in All My Sons; Richard Armitage in The Crucible; David Tennant and Catherine Tate in Much Ado About Nothing; operas and ballets from the Royal Opera House and the English National Ballet; and concerts conducted by Sir Simon Rattle and starring the London Symphony Orchestra.

This means, quite simply, that you can now experience Live Theatre Anytime, Anywhere.

 

We have an exciting year ahead with lots of new content and partnerships aimed at broadening our reach and the quality of the work we present. 

 

Please join us and follow us on social media.

 

www.digitaltheatre.com

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