TAITMAIL Wimbledon’s acting lesson

TAITMAIL Wimbledon’s acting lesson

Wimbledon College of Arts is turfing out its fine arts operation so that it can teach acting. In three years or so, if things go according to plan, half of the thousand students in the leafiest corner of the University of the Arts London (UAL) empire will be performers; the other half will be costume or set designers.

City scope: putting culture alongside housing

City scope: putting culture alongside housing

Last week we brought you the report of the Cultural Cities Enquiry which could shift the base of arts funding in this country. But what does it mean? Jonathan Todd, chief economist at BOP Consulting, was part of the research team that led the UK-wide consultation process and provided the year-long enquiry with its essential data

RA picks Axel Rűger as new CEO

RA picks Axel Rűger as new CEO

Axel Rűger, director of Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum, is to succeed Sir Charles Saumarez Smith as secretary and chief executive of the Royal Academy.

Fatoş Üstek next Liverpool Biennial director

Fatoş Üstek next Liverpool Biennial director

The new director of the Liverpool Biennial is to be the Turkish-born curator and writer Fatoş Üstek.

Making an art school for actors

Making an art school for actors

Can - should - an art school teach acting? The University of the Arts shares its plans for Wimbledon with Simon Tait

Arts ‘treading water’ on diversity

An Arts Council England report published today shows that its National Portfolio Organisation clients are not progressing enough with implementing diversity.

Darwin ‘Origin’ page may be sold abroad

Darwin ‘Origin’ page may be sold abroad

A temporary export bar has been placed on a handwritten page from Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species.

Laurie Sansom is new boss of Northern Broadsides

Laurie Sansom is new boss of Northern Broadsides

Northern Broadsides has appointed Laurie Sansom as its new artistic director and CEO in June this year.

TALK OF THE TOWN HALL  Council of despair?

TALK OF THE TOWN HALL Council of despair?

Patrick Kelly hears the latest municipal whispers

First steps

First steps

The National Youth Dance Company is in rehearsal for its seventh professional new production – with it seventh new troupe. Simon Tait talks to the company’s general manager Hannah Kirkpatrick

New trust to give London artists affordable studios

Private and public funding are coming together to create an independent trust to provide affordable workspaces for artists in London.

MA warns of ‘highly damaging’ No Deal

Association fears museums face substantial losses

The real Mary Queen of Scots

The real Mary Queen of Scots

A rare and frank portrait of the teenage Mary Queen of Scots goes on display at Hever Castle on Friday, February 8, the anniversary of her execution in 1587.

‘Culture key to cities’ growth’ – report

‘Culture key to cities’ growth’ – report

Investment in culture is the key to our cities’ growth, according to a report published today.

How reviving Bodies makes theatre magic

How reviving Bodies makes theatre magic

The husband-and-wife team of Tricia Thorns and Graham Cowley, who operate as Two’s Company, rediscover a forgotten 20thcentury theatre masterpieces and produce them. Their latest, as Simon Tait discovers, is a James Saunders gem

Jerwood fall-out threatens Hastings gallery

Jerwood fall-out threatens Hastings gallery

A “family” row is threatening the future of the award-winning Jerwood Gallery in Hastings, with the venue’s sponsors, the Jerwood Foundation, withdrawing its collection of British art and financial support.

Cinema audiences boom from UK productions

Cinema audiences boom from UK productions

UK cinema audiences have reached record numbers, with the second highest spend on film and TV production in this country.

Maritime museum chief steps down

Maritime museum chief steps down

Kevin Fewster, director of Royal Museums Greenwich since 2007, is to stand down having transformed the former National Maritime Museum with muliti-million-pound developments.

TAITMAIL The Grand Old Dame of York

TAITMAIL The Grand Old Dame of York

By Patrick Kelly

It’s always a privilege to watch a master at work, and audiences at York’s Theatre Royal were honoured to witness Berwick Kaler’s 40thand final season as panto dame. The season, as usual, has been a complete sell-out as theatregoers trampled on each other to acquire tickets for this last opportunity to see a superb craftsman go about his business.

Ex-BBC White City centre to be theatre complex

Ex-BBC White City centre to be theatre complex

The BBC’s former media village at White City in West London is to become a large-scale pop-up theatre, opening this summer.

Survey reveals massive council cuts

Council spending on museums, libraries, arts, and culture has been slashed by nearly almost £400m since 2010.

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM    Image of the month

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM Image of the month

Beyond the Deepening Shadow, The Tower of London, November 2018, by Jeremy Selwyn

‘Their finest hour’ becomes Biggin Hill museum

‘Their finest hour’ becomes Biggin Hill museum

Biggin Hill Airfield, one of the main stations flor the Battle of Britain in 1940, is having its  timeless story told in a museum that opens today.

DEA BIRKETT     But seriously – welcome!

DEA BIRKETT But seriously – welcome!

In the latest in her series marking the 250th anniversary of the circus, Dea Birkett – the official Ringmaster of Circus250 – finds that media misuse of circus language shows disrespect of a gentle art

Watson demands Brexit safeguards for artists

Labour’s shadow culture secretary and deputy leader, Tom Watson, has demanded that  artists and their free movement across Europe will not be affected by Britain’s departure from the EU.

Speaking at the third anniversary celebration of the Creative Industries Federation, Watson (pictured below) said it was not known under what terms Britain would leave the EU, or whether there would be a deal at all. “But the government needs to reassure us that they will make sure that Brexit doesn’t lead to us being culturally isolated from Europe and the world.

“And we're going to continue to press on Brexit. We want to know what it means to this sector, on the implications on for European artists and performers who’ve made careers here, on British artists and performers working in the EU, on touring productions and exhibitions and much more, and on making sure we can still benefit from European funding bodies like Creative Europe - or else money replaced in full.”

He was sharing the platform with the newly promoted culture secretary Matt Hancock and the business secretary Greg Clark, who sought to give reassurance that “the industrial strategy for this country has the cultural industries at its hub… You could not imagine a set of people or industries that better exemplify what we can do in this country in collaboration without our friends across the world”. He said he believed the government was close to making a good deal with Europe for the creative industries.

Matt Hancock said the creative industries were growing faster than ever, contributing almost £100bn to the UK economy annually. “Across the length and breadth of Britain, the power of culture and creativity is bringing people together like never before” he said.“The creative industries give a massive boost to our economy. Everyone deserves to be able to access them — regardless of your ethnicity, gender, background or taste.”

The event at the Natural History Museum was also the opportunity to launch Circus250, the 250th anniversary of the first circus, including a performance by Natasha Rushbook of the circus company Lost in Translation, pictured here.

 

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