Making the curriculum anti-war

Young people are being invited by artists to put an end to war, as a finale to the commemoration of the end of the First World War.

In a 14-18 NOW initiative, students aged 16 to 18 have been invited by the artist Bob and Roberta Smith (pictured) to “Make Art Not War” with creative work within the curriculum across any media – art, writing, photography, design, theatre or film – responding to the question “What does peace mean to you?” Modules have been devised to work with A-level and other courses.

Among the resources available to them are the short
films by 
artists 
from 
across 
the
 14‐18 NOW 
programme, 
including
 Jeremy
 Deller, 
Rachel
 Whiteread
 and 
Yinka 
Shonibare.

"14‐18
 NOW
 has
 commissioned 
leading
 artists 
from
 around
 the
 world 
to 
create
 new 
works 
for 
the
 First
 World 
War Centenary” said Jenny
 Waldman,
 director
 of
 14‐18
 NOW.  “Now
 we
 invite
 the
 next
 generation
 to
 respond
 creatively
 to
 the
 Armistice
 and
 the
 possibility 
of
 peace.
 The 
arts
 are
 a
 powerful
 catalyst
 for
 young 
people's
 engagement
 with
 the
 world,
 and
 millions
 of
 young
 people
 have
 seen 
or
 participated in
 14‐18 
NOW
 projects.
 Now
 we
 ask
students 
to
 take
 the
 lead 
and
 create
 their 
own
 work
 with 
high 
quality 
resources
 designed
 to
 develop
 essential
creative
 skills."


 

 



The 
end 
of
 the 
war
 marked
 the 
start 
of
 the
 Child
 Art
 Movement,
 a
 holistic
 and 
arts‐rich
 approach 
to 
learning
 championed 
by
 educationalists
 of 
the 
time. 
According
 to
 the
 World
 Economic 
Forum,
 by
 2020
 creativity
 will
 be 
in
 the
top
 three most 
important
 skills
 alongside
 complex 
problem 
solving
 and
 critical 
thinking.


A programme
 has been
 devised 
with
 Professor 
Bill 
Lucas
 of the University of Winchester and
 the
 former
 CEO 
of
 Creative
 & 
Cultural
 Skills,
 Pauline
 Tambling. 
It
 offers
 brand
 new 
curriculum 
resources
 designed
 specifically 
for
assessment
 within
 A 
Level
 English, 
art
 &
 design 
and 
geography.
 A 
bespoke
 artist 
mentoring 
programme 
rolls
 out 
this
 autumn 
across 
the 
leadership 
colleges
 of
 the 
National 
Skills 
Academy
 Creative
 and
 Cultural,
 and 
targeted
 curriculum 
materials
 are 
designed
 for 
inclusion 
in 
UAL awarding Body 
diplomas,
 A
 Levels
 and
 the 
extended project
 qualification, 
enabling
 over 
50,000
 students
 as 
the
 programme 
unfolds.


“For 
me,
 creativity
 is
 a 
fundamental 
life
 skill
 and
 art 
is
 a
 force 
for
 change” said Bob and Roberta Smith, the pseudonym of the artist Patrick Brill.“Make
 Art 
Not
 War
 is
 about 
fuelling
 young
 people
 across 
the
 country 
to 
find
confidenc e
in 
their
 voice, 
to
 be 
bold,
 to
 be 
original
 and 
to
 express 
their 
ideas 
and 
opinions.
 I 
think 
peace 
is
 a
 process
 that 
requires 
all
 our
 imaginations. 
Our
 project 
aims
 to
 inspire 
a 
new
 generation
 of
 young
 people 
to 
'get 
involved' 
in
 building 
a 
better 
world.”


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