MY STORY Thames artistry

Jan Lennox is director of Watermans, the West London arts centre based in Brentford. Watermans sees over 230,000 visits annually to its programme of independent cinema, children’s and asian theatre, exhibitions, courses and festivals. Watermans also leads several other major projects: bell square, a three year-old outdoor arts venue in hounslow, staging free fortnightly events; the Circulate consortium, a network of london venues promoting outdoor arts in underserved boroughs and Creative people & places hounslow, part of ACE’s major investment in building new arts audiences

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GOOD PRACTICE Young, free and enjoying theatre

Kate Pakenham explains how the Donmar Warehouse’s free ticket scheme can ensure more young people access shakespeare’s finest works

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HERITAGE Invaluable assets

Cultural heritage is the target of acquisitions, but this time it’s the community behind the takeover

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DEA BIRKETT Berlin walls

Dea Birkett finds that the German capital’s new architectural splendour can oppress rather than enlighten

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AI PROFILE Brum's royals

Jan Teo, chief executive, Birmingham Royal Ballet

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MUSIC Coming in with a bang

The rhythms of drum ensembles put together in a Barbican project are bringing down social barriers in East End schools - so successfully that now the project is going it alone

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CHILDREN'S THEATRE We are what we play

What makes babies laugh? Why “the terrible twos”? Are teenagers programmed to be difficult? Making children’s theatre is more than entertaining young audiences. Polka Theatre, founded almost 50 years ago in Wimbledon, is also linking up with scientists to explore the audience with its festival Brain Waves

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Patrick Kelly's back page

AI's pick of what's to come

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PASSING BY... Brown study

In 40 years Antony Thorncroft has watched the auction scene change into a money market

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EDINBURGH Post-war pragmatics

This month more than four million visitors will descend on Edinburgh for its International Festival and its Fringe, but what does it mean to the venues beyond August? Simon Tait looks at two of them

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MY STORY The show goes on

The Cabaret Mechanical Theatre was founded by Sue Jackson in 1979 in a small shop in Falmouth, Cornwall, from where she turned the vVctorian diversionary craft of automata-making into an art form and eventually a global success. Following Sue’s sudden death in April this year aged 77, Cabaret is taking on a new lease of life under the guidance of her daughter, Sarah Alexander. The Crafts Council’s exhibition, A Curious Turn: Moving mechanical sculpture will celebrate 40 years of British automata and opens on September 15 at Habitat’s King’s Road Platform Gallery as part of the London Design Festival before a two-year nationwide tour. it was a project Sue had helped plan, but never witnessed and is dedicated to her memory

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SIMON TAIT'S DIARY

Frank’s pick

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