Antony Sher dies

Antony Sher dies

Sir Antony Sher, perhaps the finest actor of his generation, has died aged 72, the Royal Shakespeare Company announced today.

TAITMAIL   Behind the battlements

TAITMAIL Behind the battlements

Nottingham Castle Museum was doing well, for a museum without much real history left to talk about, and it was getting a healthy 150,000 visitors a year - about half what Stonehenge gets - before it closed for its £30m refurb which it was hoped would double the numbers. 

Shebeen culture wins Turner Prize

Shebeen culture wins Turner Prize

Array Collective, the Belfast co-operative of 11 artists whose nominated work, The Druithaib’s Ball, is an installation centred on an illicit Irish drinking den described as “a place to gather outside the sectarian divides”, has won the 2021 Turner Prize.

ACE’s £38.3m for local culture

ACE’s £38.3m for local culture

Arts Council England has today announced grants worth £38.3m for the programme that makes partners of cultural organisations and communities.

Bird to quit SOLT and UK Theatre

Bird to quit SOLT and UK Theatre

Julian Bird is to stand down as CEO of the Society of London Theatre and UK Theatre after more than 11 years. 

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM Image of the month

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM Image of the month

London’s East End, June, 1957, by Frank Pocklington

Alan Sparrow talks to Frank Pocklington about his favourite Picture Post photograph

Sacha Craddock stands down at New Contemporaries

Sacha Craddock stands down at New Contemporaries

Sacha Craddock is stepping down as chair of New Contemporaries, the organisation set up more than 70 years ago to support emerging visual artists with touring exhibitions of their work.

Eilish McGuinness takes over at NHLF

Eilish McGuinness takes over at NHLF

Eilish McGuinness is to take over from Ros Kerslake as CEO of the National Heritage Lottery Fund at the end of the year.

Lewisham’s year of diverse culture

Lewisham’s year of diverse culture

Lewisham is to be London’s next Borough of Culture for 2022, focusing on diversity, activism and the climate emergency in a programme that was announced at the Rivoli Ballroom today.

Emmie Kell is ACE's new museums chief

Emmie Kell is ACE's new museums chief

Emmie Kell, CEO of the Cornwall Museums Partnership, is to be Arts Council England’s new director of museums and cultural property.

Merger creates Creative UK

Merger creates Creative UK

The Creative Industries Federation and Creative England have merged today to become Creative UK, bringing together the advocacy work of one body and the investment expertise and practical support of the other.

Kathryn Jacob to chair HOME

Kathryn Jacob to chair HOME

Kathryn Jacob, CEO of the cinema advertising agency Pearl & Dean, is to be the new chair of the Manchester arts centre HOME.

33% of musicians still earning nothing from music

33% of musicians still earning nothing from music

A third of our professional musicians are earning nothing from music and 87% are earning less than £1,000 a month, according to new figures today from the charity Help Musicians.

£1m hunt for young museumgoers as ‘perfect storm’ looms

£1m hunt for young museumgoers as ‘perfect storm’ looms

The Art Fund has launched a £1m fundraising campaign to help museums attract under 24-year-olds.

Another £107m for arts recovery

Another £107m for arts recovery

Almost 1,000 arts organisations are to benefit from a new round of £107m worth of grants from the government’s Culture Recovery Fund.

£5m for community jubilee parties

£5m for community jubilee parties

A new Arts Council fund is offering £5m to help voluntary and community organisations celebrate the Queen’s platinum jubilee next year.

Curators share £300k development funding

Curators share £300k development funding

The Art Fund has named the 11 museum professionals that will share the Headley Fellowship’s grants this year worth £302,500 to extend their collections knowledge.

THE WORD   Under-estimating the power of the tweet

THE WORD Under-estimating the power of the tweet

Social media have become essential to arts organisations, says a new report, and often rely on underpaid and under-resourced operators. Alice Kent of the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre asks what can professional networks, industry, funders and policy-makers do to ensure that digital workers are better supported

Birthday royal sculptures for Albert Hall

Birthday royal sculptures for Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall has commissioned sculptures of the Queen, Prince Philip, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert from four young artists to mark its 150th anniversary.

Ten Manchester music creatives offered £1k development packages

Ten Manchester music creatives offered £1k development packages

Manchester International Festival is offering £1,000 each to ten local musicians to help them create new work as part of its MIF Sounds initiative, launched last year at the height of the pandemic.

Florence Nightingale joins Lord Mayor’s parade

Florence Nightingale joins Lord Mayor’s parade

Marking the completion of her 200th birthday celebrations., Florence Nightingale joined the Lord Mayor of London’s Show at the weekend.

Giant print plant plays host to classical experiment

Giant print plant plays host to classical experiment

A printing plant that once one of the largest in Europe has been the venue for a pioneering immersive concert.

Mariam Zulfiqar to lead Artangel

Mariam Zulfiqar to lead Artangel

Mariam Zulfiqar, Forestry England’s contemporary art programme manager since March this year, is to be the new director or of the public art producer Artangel.

Barbican takes action after damning discrimination report

Barbican takes action after damning discrimination report

The Barbican has vowed to take decisive action “to build a culture where staff feel confident, valued and respected” following a damning report by an independent investigation team.

TRAINING School of Maria '04

The career of the new director of Tate took a powerful new turn after becoming one of the first fellows on the Clore Leadership Programme, now interviewing for its 14th intake

The Clore Leadership Programme began 13 years ago, the brainwave of Dame Vivien Duffield who was appalled at the lack of homegrown leaders in the British cultural fabric, with the main institutions, National Gallery, British Museum, Royal Opera House, circulating the same faces between them.

This course, with its fellows nominated from the arts community, would take the talent that abounded in the lower echelons and prepare it for the top.

One of that first intake of 2004 was the slight, shy 34-year-old director of Creative Partnerships Birmingham who had expected her career to be in academia. Her mentor then, coincidentally, was the programme’s current chair, the former director of the National Portrait Gallery Sandy Nairne.

She went on to a museum career which has brought her the most glittering of prizes in the sector, as director of Tate.

But although Dr Maria Balshaw CBE is the highest flying of Clore Leadership Programme fellows so far, she

comes from a cohort whose talents have brought them to the forefront of their professions.

Sue Hoyle., who is to stand down as director in the summer, has run the programme from the start, first as deputy director under Chris Smith and since 2008 as his successor. “The kind of leadership we’re looking for now” she told AI then “is not just focussed on one person; what we’re doing is encouraging, inspiring and supporting individuals to reach their potential, and therefore organisations to reach their potential, and I feel that’s really what motivates me”.

The programme has built and evolved since then, but the first intake, says Hoyle as she sifts applications for the 2017-18 intake, helped to mould it: “They were real pioneers, in a way they shared in the experiment with us. They were innovators who put themselves forward with a strong statement of intent and they were willing to go with it, and they had a sense or respect for the programme. They still come back as mentors, as secondment hosts or speakers”.

The programme has evolved as requirements have changed. It includes modules on press relations and presentation, on fundraising, on advocacy, on lobbying and, since 2011, on governance and boards. The Clore has developed partnerships, takes fellows from overseas institutes now, liaising closely with the Foreign Office, and works with consortia of organisations such as the British Museum and the South Bank Centre. In fact, it’s working with a group of trusts and foundations on a strategic review of governance which will publish its report in April.

The course is now one year instead of two to make them less disruptive to parent organisations, and there have been over 300 fellows (there are 27 on the current programme). The are ten times as many applications as there are places. There are also short two week courses - the 50th runs this month - while there is also a one week course for young emerging leaders.

The Clore has become the blueprint for leadership courses around the world. “Judging by the number of people applying the need is still very great” says Hoyle. “Leaders are more vital than ever now”.

 

Some other

fellows of the

class of ’04…

Susanna Eastburn was running the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival and went on to become director of music at the Arts Council. Now she is chief executive of Sound and Music which champions new music.

Teo Greenstreet had already founded Circus Space in 2004, and now heads a consultancy helping performing arts organisations develop – “not ticking boxes but gaining value”.

Ellie Maxwell had already founded Firefly International fostering multi-ethnic youth projects in Bosnia and other troublespots, but she was unable to fulfill her enormous potential. She died of cancer five years

after doing the course, aged 32.

Ciara Eastell was an assistant county librarian in Somerset and is now CEO of Libraries Unlimited in Devon. A former

president of the Society of Chief Librarians, she was awarded an OBE last year.

Nick Merriman was a reader at University College London in 2004, and is now

director of the Manchester Museum. He is married to Maria Balshaw whom he met on the Clore programme.

Stephen Escritt was an antiques dealer turned journalist and lecturer who runs Counterculture, which helps cultural, educational, heritage, creative organisations and individuals “to plan, manage and thrive”.

Katrina Newell was a youth arts worker in north Belfast, and is now head of Ashton Community Trust and New Lodge Arts Project in Co Down.

Eddie Nixon was a freelance dancer with New Adventures, The Featherstonehaughs and DV 8 and is now director of theatre and artist development at The Place.

Matthew Peacock founded Streetwise Opera for homeless performers, and since 2004 has taken the company to be a major part of two Olympic opening events, creating a worldwide movement.

Gavin Reid was a freelance trumpet player at the time of his fellowship, and last year he was appointed chief executive of the

Scottish Chamber Orchestra.

Jacqueline Riding was the director of the small Handel House Museum in 2004, and has since become a prolific historian whose latest book, A New History of the ’45 Rebellion, was published last year.

Axel Ruger was curator of Dutch paintings for the National Gallery when he did the leadership course, and is now director of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

Erica Whyman was artistic director of the Gate Theatre when she joined the programme, went on to be chief executive

of Northern Stage in Newcastle and is now deputy artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Nii Sackey founded Bigga Fish, which provides youth education through music, multimedia and entertainment, when he was 21. It now serves communities across the UK.

Moira Sinclair ran an agency providing arts projects for hospital patients and staff. Via running Arts Council London she is now chief executive of the Paul Hamlyn Trust.

Kathleen Soriano was head of exhibitions and collections management at the National Portrait Gallery who went on to be director of exhibitions at the Royal Academy. She is the new chair of the Liverpool Biennial.

Julia Twomlow was running the Acorn Theatre in Penzance in 2004, and has just been appointed the new chief executive of the Rothsay Pavilion.

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