Plea to Johnson: Don’t sacrifice creative industries

One of the first letters in the new prime minister’s in-tray will be from Alan Bishop, CEO of the Creative Industries Federation, demanding a second referendum to save the creative industries.

Writing on behalf of a sector that in 2017 contributed £101.5bn GVA, more than aerospace, automotive, life sciences and oil and gas sectors combined, he says that he will campaign rigorously on behalf of the 2m jobs in the creative industries: “We will continue to stress the extreme damage that would be caused by a no-deal Brexit" Bishop says.

“The free movement of goods, services, capital and people have underpinned the sector’s success, and we urge all the leaders of the UK’s political parties to support a second referendum rather than crash out of the EU.”

He also calls for Johnson’s government to encourage young people to study creative subjects at GCSE and beyond, both at secondary and tertiary level.

Even before Johnson has been able to  form a cabinet, let alone name a chancellor or a culture secretary, Bishop reminds him that Arts Council England figures show has shown that through taxes alone, arts and culture generates £5 for every £1 of public investment, while the BFI has demonstrated that in 2016 £632 million in tax relief seeded £3.16 billion in direct production spend across the UK’s screen industries.

World-renowned for music, performing arts, films, museums and heritage, design and craftsmanship, he says the UK is pre-eminent in competitive marketing and advertising industries, and for the individuality of sectors ranging from fashion to architecture to publishing.

“At this vital time” Bishop writes “we urge you to take advantage of the many opportunities to enable even more impressive success and global impact across the UK’s creative industries.” 

 

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